How Sound Panels Work

To understand how sound panels work, start with the basic understanding of perceived noise.   When an original sound is produced, such as the bark of a dog, there will be two distinct sound signals generated.   The first sound wave will be the original sound of the bark of the dog, traveling along at a speed…

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How to Soundproof a Gun Range

The design function for soundproofing a gun range is to mitigate noise exposure levels for both the shooter, members of the range, and the neighboring community. The definition of the noise reduction project depends on the starting point.   Is this an indoor gun range or an outdoor gun range, and who are we seeking to…

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Acoustic Foam Options

There are two basic core foam choices when selecting acoustic foam for your sound control needs.   Open cell polyurethane foam or open cell melamine foam.   First, note that closed cell foam does not absorb sound, the pores of the foam do not collect sound wave energy, the foam must be open cell.   Second, the difference…

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Sound Panel Thickness

The key to the success of a sound panel treatment lies in product selection first, and then ensuring that the room receives the proper amount of material.   If a client under treats their space, the sound values will collapse.   But if the client introduces the right amount of sound panels, the echoes collapse and the…

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The Two Second Rule in Acoustics

Take any restaurant, sanctuary, classroom, fellowship hall, band room, conference room or recording studio.  Stand in the center of the room and clap your hands.   If the room is properly treated for acoustics, the background sound wave reflections will bounce off perimeter surfaces and die off within two seconds.   Two seconds is the threshold level…

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Sculpted vs Flat Foam Panels

Sculpted foam panels, or panels that have a convolution (pattern) cut into their face, expose more of the pores of the foam to air space, increasing the panels ability to capture and convert more sound wave reflections out of a space.   Flat foam has a lower overall surface area, presenting fewer pores to the same…

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#1 Mistake With Acoustic Foam Panels

We constantly remind our clients that acoustic foam panels absorb echo, but they don’t block noise.   For clients seeking to isolate a noise source, foam is NOT the answer.   Foam protects the people inside the same room the noise is generated from, by collecting echoes and converting them out of the room.   Foam makes it…

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Why Acoustic Foam is Bad for Restaurants

Loud noisy restaurants drive repeat business away and threaten the long term success to the restaurant owner.  Once a restaurant gets tagged as being too “noisy”, the stigma is hard to shake.   Smart restaurant owners will take steps to lower the excessive levels of noise, protecting their customers, and their long term success to their…

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Best Product for Enclosure Lining

Got a stationary noise source that emits too much noise?   Need protection from the noise?  Whether commercial, residential, or industrial, the product remains the same.   For noise sources that are enclosed, such as an engine or a pump, from an aquarium tank to a boat engine, a simple sound panel called an FBF1M panel is available in…

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